Quick Answer: How Do I Choose A Well Location?

Can you dig a well anywhere?

You probably can drill your own well on your property.

You, of course, would have to contact your local building department to see if there are any regulations that must be followed.

Some states and cities may still charge you for the water that’s pulled from your land, but that’s a debate for another day..

How Far Should a well be from the house?

The state’s horizontal separation distance (setback) mandates a minimum of 100 feet. However, if you have a well that serves a single family dwelling and due to lot restrictions, you cannot achieve 100 feet, the setback may be reduced to a minimum of 50 feet.

What is the average cost to have a well installed?

Well Drilling Cost Drilling a well costs $5,500 for an average depth of 150 feet. Most projects range between $1,500 and $12,000. Expect to pay between $15 and $30 per foot of depth, or up to $50 for difficult terrain. Digging might be enough for shallow depths, ranging between $10 and $25 per square foot.

How deep should a well be for drinking water?

between 10 and 30 feetDug wells are the shallowest type of well, typically between 10 and 30 feet deep; therefore, the most likely to become contaminated from nearby agricultural, industrial, or urban sites. Driven wells are hammered into the ground and draw water from the saturated zone.

Does a deeper wells mean better water?

Water quality in a deep well usually changes more slowly than in a shallow well. That’s because groundwater does some mixing as it moves through the aquifer. A spill a mile away from your deep well in the Basin and Range aquifer might be substantially diluted with clean aquifer water before it gets to your well.

How do I find the water table in my area?

How to Find My Water TableCall your local County Extension Office. It may have statistics for the average annual water table level in your area. … Look online. Check out the website for your local Water Resources Office. … Dig. This is the most reliable way to find the water table level on your land.